Public Appearances H1 2016

Here’s where I’ll hang out in the following months:

26-28 January 2016: BIWA Summit 2016 in Redwood Shores, CA

10-11 February 2016: RMOUG Training Days in Denver, CO

25 February 2016: Yorkshire Database (YoDB) in Leeds, UK

6-10 March 2016: Hotsos Symposium, Dallas, TX

10-14 April 2016: IOUG Collaborate, Las Vegas, NV

  • Beer session: Not speaking myself but planning to hang out on a first couple of conference days, drink beer and attend Gluent colleague Maxym Kharchenko‘s presentations

24-26 April 2016: Enkitec E4, Barcelona, Spain

18-19 May 2016: Great Lakes Oracle Conference (GLOC) in Cleveland, OH

  • I plan to submit abstracts (and hope to get some accepted :)
  • The abstract submission is still open until 1st February 2016

2-3 June 2016: AMIS 25 – Beyond the Horizon near Leiden, Netherlands

  • This AMIS 25th anniversary event will take place in a pretty cool location – an old military airport hangar (and abstract submission is still open :)
  • I plan to deliver 2 presentations, one about the usual Oracle performance stuff I do and one about Hadoop

5-7 June 2016: Enkitec E4, Dallas, TX

 

As you can see, I have changed my “I don’t want to travel anymore” policy ;-)

 

Posted in Announcement | 2 Comments

Gluent launch! New production release, new HQ, new website!

I’m happy to announce that the last couple of years of hard work is paying off and the Gluent Offload Engine is production now! After beta testing with our early customers, we are now out of complete stealth mode and are ready talk more about what exactly are we doing :-)

Check out our new website and product & use case info here!

Follow us on Twitter:

We are hiring! Need to fill that new Dallas World HQ ;-) Our distributed teams around the US and in London need more helping hands (and brains!) too.

You’ll be hearing more of us soon :-)

Paul & Tanel just moved in to Gluent World HQ
Paul & Tanel just moved in to Gluent World HQ
Posted in Announcement, Big Data, Cool stuff, Hadoop, Oracle | 7 Comments

RAM is the new disk – and how to measure its performance – Part 3 – CPU Instructions & Cycles

If you haven’t read the previous parts of this series yet, here are the links: [ Part 1 | Part 2 ].

A Refresher

In the first part of this series I said that RAM access is the slow component of a modern in-memory database engine and for performance you’d want to reduce RAM access as much as possible. Reduced memory traffic thanks to the new columnar data formats is the most important enabler for the awesome In-Memory processing performance and SIMD is just icing on the cake.

In the second part I also showed how to measure the CPU efficiency of your (Oracle) process using a Linux perf stat command. How well your applications actually utilize your CPU execution units depends on many factors. The biggest factor is your process’es cache efficiency that depends on the CPU cache size and your application’s memory access patterns. Regardless of what the OS CPU accounting tools like top or vmstat may show you, your “100% busy” CPUs may actually spend a significant amount of their cycles internally idle, with a stalled pipeline, waiting for some event (like a memory line arrival from RAM) to happen.

Luckily there are plenty of tools for measuring what’s actually going on inside the CPUs, thanks to modern processors having CPU Performance Counters (CPC) built in to them.

A key derived metric for understanding CPU-efficiency is the IPC (instructions per cycle). Years ago people were actually talking about the inverse metric CPI (cycles per instruction) as on average it took more than one CPU cycle to complete an instruction’s execution (again, due to the abovementioned reasons like memory stalls). However, thanks to today’s superscalar processors with out-of-order execution on a modern CPU’s multiple execution units – and with large CPU caches – a well-optimized application can execute multiple instructions per a single CPU cycle, thus it’s more natural to use the IPC (instructions-per-cycle) metric. With IPC, higher is better.

Continue reading

Posted in InMemory, Linux, Oracle | 6 Comments

Troubleshooting Another Complex Performance Issue – Oracle direct path inserts and SEG$ contention

Here’s an updated presentation I first delivered at Hotsos Symposium 2015.

It’s about lots of concurrent PX direct path insert ant CTAS statements that, when clashing with another bug/problem, caused various gc buffer busy waits and enq: TX – allocate ITL entry contention. This got amplified thanks to running this concurrent workload on 4 RAC nodes:

When reviewing these slides, I see there’s quite a lot that needs to be said in addition to what’s on slides, so this might just mean a (Powerpoint) hacking session some day!

Posted in Oracle | Leave a comment

My Oracle OpenWorld presentations

Oracle OpenWorld is just around the corner – I will have one presentation at OOW this year and another at the independent OTW event:

Connecting Oracle with Hadoop

Real-Time SQL Monitoring in Oracle Database 12c

  • Conference: OpenWorld
  • Time: Wednesday, 28 Oct, 3:00pm
  • Location: Moscone South 103
  • Abstract: Click here (sign up to guarantee a seat!)

I plan to hang out at the OTW venue on Monday and Tuesday, so see you there!

 

Posted in Announcement, Hadoop, Oracle, Oracle 12c | Leave a comment

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting v2.5 (with 12c stuff too)

It took a while (1.5 years since my last class – I’ve been busy!), but I am ready with my Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting training (version 2.5) that has plenty of updates, including some more modern DB kernel tracing & ASH stuff and of course Oracle 12c topics!

The online training will take place on 16-20 November & 14-18 December 2015 (Part 1 and Part 2).

The latest TOC is below:

Seminar registration details:

A notable improvement of AOT v2.5: now attendees will get downloadable video recordings after the sessions for personal use! So, no crappy streaming with 14-day expiry date, you can download the video MP4 files straight to your computer or tablet and keep for your use forever!

I won’t be doing any other classes this year, but there will be some more (pleasant) surprises coming next year ;-)

See you soon!

Posted in Announcement, Oracle, Oracle 12c, Productivity | 4 Comments